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I wanted to keep trying some new shirt refashioning design concepts and this was one of the more experimental shirts. It started with a very plain grey shirt, in a polo style. I mixed it with a pair of small men’s shirts that both had some teal and black in their patterns. A small length of fabric in black and white was added in as well.

The central grey shirt was cut right up the side seams and the sleeves fully removed. The collar was also taken off and a v-shaped yoke cut in.

Large, roughly diamond shaped pieces were added to the sides. The tops were not pointed but flat, to enlarge the arm holes. I put in one of each of the donor patterns and let the bottom points extend below the hem of the central shirt.

Big, blousey sleeves were made using the donor plaid shirts. Each one had a large strip of the black and white fabric as the top with the plaid along the bottom. They were gathered slightly into salvaged cuffs with a rolled hem space between the edges. The contrasting cuff was used for each sleeve and the sleeves contrast with the side inserts. (so the sides and cuffs match)

The drama level of what was done to this point meant that the neckline needed to stand up so a large ruffle was made from the black and white fabric which was soft and flowy. There was enough of the darker plaid left to edge the inside of the neck and tie it all together.

This turned out to be a little too busy, even for me, but it was a possible way to use smaller amounts of fabrics. The other flaw was that the lighter plaid fabric wasn’t wash-and-wear, but needed ironing after every wash. That was too much trouble and this one didn’t end up getting worn very much.

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The store will be closed the weekend of June 23-24 since I will be a vendor at the Oxford Ren fest, just outside of London. This is the first year for us at this newer location but we’d been pretty regular when they were in Woodstock.

I’m moving away from the masks so will have a big selection along at great prices. The mutant stuffies, jackets and jewellery as well as some other oddities will also be under the tent.

As a result, the shop will be closed but we may be able to arrange it if you want to stop in. Just email or phone but I won’t be there for framing..

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Having succeeded with my first refashion of a men’s shirt to a skirt graft, I was looking to make another plus-sized dress in the same style. The second attempt started with a men’s 3X plaid shirt. While it was in mint condition, the dullness of the colours had kept me from using it as one of the basic tunic tops. A pretty little black linen skirt looked to be a good match so I put them together. The skirt was quite small, a 6 or 8, but had a very wide flare to the bottom so I was able to keep around 8” and still have the top edge line up with my shirt hem. I really liked that the skirt looks like it has a couple of layers due to the edging of black eyelet lace on it’s bottom.

There was enough room in the shirt that I was able to do some shaping around the waist. I put in a pair of darts below the breast-line as well as taking in the side seams slightly at the waist. This was done before altering the rest of the shirt.

Once the waist shaping was done, I cut out the side seams to just below where I’d come in at the waist. Then, a pair of triangle inserts were cut from the skirt fabric and sewn in. They give both some accent to the sides and a bit more swing to the hemline.

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The bottom of the shirt was cut to a straight line, folded over and sewn down to the skirt cut-off.

The shirt was more than wide enough on the arms so they were simply cut off at 3/4 length.

It was starting to look pretty dressy at this point so I decided to run with it. I had a black silk velvet scarf in the stash and used it to both trim the sleeves and make a new top for the collar. As before, the original collar was removed and used as a pattern for the replacement. In this case, I wanted a bit more drama to it, so I kept the same shape at the bottom of the collar but expanded it at the top. To do it, I traced the original on some craft paper and then sketched out some possibles. Once I had something I liked, I folded it over and cut the second side to make sure they matched. Since the new pattern had stayed the same at the bottom, it fitted perfectly. Black interfacing was needed, due to the transparency of the silk velvet.

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Finally, a set of fancy buttons finish the look. While they look great, they are a bit too big to fit through the buttonholes so the front was sewn down and the buttons sewn into place over their buttonholes. Making them completely decorative was optional but the sew-down should prevent future ironing problems.

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(I want to mention that while the pictures make it look like the skirt is significantly lighter than the collar and trim, it really isn’t. I had to fade the pictures out a bit so you could see any detail on the skirt due to the intensity of it’s blackness!)

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We have a pretty wide assortment of edible plants on the property already but I am unable to resist adding more. The latest find is a clove current. We have some black currants already and used to have a couple of large red currant bushes in the past. (the red were taken out to make room for things that we will actually eat) What appealed to me about this one is that it’s a native to North America. It’s called a clove currant since the flowers smell like clove. They are edible and I tried one and the taste is very much like a light vanilla with a hint of clovey spice. They would make a nice addition to a fruit or light green salad. (I’m going to be tempted to try candying them when we have more) Apparently, the berries are a bit bigger than the black and similar in flavour, but milder. That sounds like a winner to me!

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This is showing how I remade a regular sized men’s plaid shirt into a cute plus-sized ladies top. I may very much enjoy “dresses” I can wear over leggings, but I do live in Canada and the winters are cold. Since there is a chunk of the year that I have to wear real pants, I also need tops to go with them. Plaid is lovely stuff for winter with it being so soft and cozy but as usual, finding nice options in plus sizes is difficult. I also wanted a bit more a feminine feel than most men’s plaid shirts provide. I’d seen examples of ombre bleach fading and I liked how it both softened the look and added a bit of style. It seemed simple enough that I had to try it.

Finding a few suitable starting pieces took a bit of hunting but I came across this beautiful rainbow plaid from American Eagle. It was an extra large, but their sizing runs small so it was too tight for me, including the arms.

The first thing was to do the ombre fade. I tried a few levels of bleach dilution and realized that you have to start with pure bleach. I used a spray bottle, outside on the cement driveway. To get a visible fade, I never went below 50% dilution, but just finished the fade out by lighter spraying. As soon as it was where I wanted, the whole thing was rinsed several times in clear water and then dried. (if I had realized exactly how I was going to alter the sleeves, that should have been done before the fading)

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It needed to be made quite a bit larger so the sleeves were cut off to the elbow length and then I fully cut out the side seams, including down what was left of the arms. The sleeves were enlarged by adding some of the cut-off forearm along the bottom. It was then finished along the top with the salvaged cuffs and a rolled hem completing the space between the cuff edges.

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The fade helped to soften the style, but I wanted to make it even more feminine and used a cream cotton eyelet lace to make the side inserts. (it also matched the lightest bottom of the fade) It was quite long for eyelet, but was still only about 2/3rds of the length of the sides. To make it fit, I layered a second panel over the first. This gave a bit of ruffle feel to the sides without adding much volume and it meant there was a second layer of fabric under the higher eyelets which made me more comfortable.

In this case, the buttons were left since they read as more decorative on the lightened fabric.

I love this top! It’s so soft and cheery and the swing of the expanded size combined with it’s bright colours and lace accents make it read as quite fun and feminine.

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Away

I’m going to be away from the store this week so we will be closed until the 31st of May. If you are in the area, you can still make an appointment to stop in, (call or email) but I won’t be available for framing consultations!

This was another of the more experimental pieces. I’ve seen a number of reclaimed designs that used panels from different shirts, typically with a straight fall from below the bust-line, and I wanted to see how I liked that style.

I started with a trio of blue men’s shirts. All were on the smaller side and pretty boring so a co-coordinating scarf was added into the mix to give some contrast. The one I chose to use as the central point was still a bit small so the sleeves were cut out and it was fully opened up the sides. It’s front was cut off, just down from my bust-line and the backs of the other 2 shirts were cut out and then slightly gathered to make a new bottom to the front. They were both cut a bit more than half-way across, just as the hemlines started to curve back up. This meant that I ended up with a generous amount of each fabric and was able to use the existing bottom hems. A stripe of the dark scarf was added down the sides and it’s bottom hem curved so it bridged the gap between the shorter back hem and the lower start of the front curve.

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Roomy, half-length sleeves were made from the old fronts of the shirts that provided the front. I went with one of each, but you could make a matching pair. They were edged with more of the accent scarf fabric. (I found it much easier to put the trim on the sleeves when they were still flat)

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To finish things off, the top of the collar was also replaced with the accent fabric. Again, the easiest way to do this is to remove the old collar and use it as the pattern for the new one. Unfortunately, ironing is necessary but it does pay off in the how much more finished the final product looks!

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I found this to be a good way to use some the duller shirts that were, luckily, in a similar colour group. The finished piece was very comfortable and it’s a style that makes it easy to control and personalize the new fit, even if I don’t think the drop style of the front flatters me personally. Unfortunately, the scarf fabric turned out to be extremely unstable and it didn’t hold up to repeated washing so it didn’t survive many wearings. I should have clued into the potential problem when I saw how loose the weave was but I was seduced by how perfectly it tied all the colours together. Lesson learned!

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