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Posts Tagged ‘plus-sized refashion’

While I was getting more comfortable with making shirt dresses, which I’ll be showing, I also wanted to keep trying some new things. The success rates for some of these varies, but I learned from making the attempts so figure it’s worth sharing them.

For a while, our local thrift store would mark older items down severely, so I was able to collect a number of pieces to play with for practically free. Several of what I made from them were more about trying to see what was possible more than expecting to get wearable items out of them. This sweater is one of the experimentals. The starting sweater was far too small for me but coordinated perfectly with a (also too small) plaid shirt.

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To make a plus-sized shirt it would have been possible to simply cut straight up the side and widen it and the sleeve together, but I wanted to see if they could be done in such a way that it looked a bit more like a design choice rather than simple enlargement. To do it, I cut up the side seams and fully removed the arms. (I often find that cutting out the seams is a better use of your time than ripping them. This is especially relevant when the seam has been overlock sewn as these were)

Panels were added to sides and another pair with equal width, at the top, was added to the sleeve. For the sleeve pieces, I cut down the middle of the top and added the plaid fabric in there. The sweater was knit, so to do an easy finish for the sleeve ends I added a band of the plaid. This gave it an even more finished look and prevented the ripple you can get from sewing knitted fabrics. (I also don’t have a Serger so this is one workaround)

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The sweater also had a turtleneck. It was too tight and I’m not fond of them so I cut a scoop neckline and grafted in the top of the plaid shirt. To do the graft, I cut the plaid part much larger and fitted it into the opening I wanted and then cut off the extra from the seam once it was in. It’s vital that you make sure you keep the grafted part with a big enough opening that it still fits over your head.

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Due to my generous use of the plaid, pretty much the entire shirt was consumed so it took a full two small pieces to make this one plus sized top.

Overall, I wasn’t in love with the finished product. I think the sleeve/sides work fairly well, but the grafted neckline didn’t end up the way I’d hoped. I think a prettier option might have been to go for a simple yoke neckline edged in the plaid, but that would be more work than I think I would want to invest in these starting materials.

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