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Having succeeded with my first refashion of a men’s shirt to a skirt graft, I was looking to make another plus-sized dress in the same style. The second attempt started with a men’s 3X plaid shirt. While it was in mint condition, the dullness of the colours had kept me from using it as one of the basic tunic tops. A pretty little black linen skirt looked to be a good match so I put them together. The skirt was quite small, a 6 or 8, but had a very wide flare to the bottom so I was able to keep around 8” and still have the top edge line up with my shirt hem. I really liked that the skirt looks like it has a couple of layers due to the edging of black eyelet lace on it’s bottom.

There was enough room in the shirt that I was able to do some shaping around the waist. I put in a pair of darts below the breast-line as well as taking in the side seams slightly at the waist. This was done before altering the rest of the shirt.

Once the waist shaping was done, I cut out the side seams to just below where I’d come in at the waist. Then, a pair of triangle inserts were cut from the skirt fabric and sewn in. They give both some accent to the sides and a bit more swing to the hemline.

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The bottom of the shirt was cut to a straight line, folded over and sewn down to the skirt cut-off.

The shirt was more than wide enough on the arms so they were simply cut off at 3/4 length.

It was starting to look pretty dressy at this point so I decided to run with it. I had a black silk velvet scarf in the stash and used it to both trim the sleeves and make a new top for the collar. As before, the original collar was removed and used as a pattern for the replacement. In this case, I wanted a bit more drama to it, so I kept the same shape at the bottom of the collar but expanded it at the top. To do it, I traced the original on some craft paper and then sketched out some possibles. Once I had something I liked, I folded it over and cut the second side to make sure they matched. Since the new pattern had stayed the same at the bottom, it fitted perfectly. Black interfacing was needed, due to the transparency of the silk velvet.

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Finally, a set of fancy buttons finish the look. While they look great, they are a bit too big to fit through the buttonholes so the front was sewn down and the buttons sewn into place over their buttonholes. Making them completely decorative was optional but the sew-down should prevent future ironing problems.

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(I want to mention that while the pictures make it look like the skirt is significantly lighter than the collar and trim, it really isn’t. I had to fade the pictures out a bit so you could see any detail on the skirt due to the intensity of it’s blackness!)

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This is showing how I remade a regular sized men’s plaid shirt into a cute plus-sized ladies top. I may very much enjoy “dresses” I can wear over leggings, but I do live in Canada and the winters are cold. Since there is a chunk of the year that I have to wear real pants, I also need tops to go with them. Plaid is lovely stuff for winter with it being so soft and cozy but as usual, finding nice options in plus sizes is difficult. I also wanted a bit more a feminine feel than most men’s plaid shirts provide. I’d seen examples of ombre bleach fading and I liked how it both softened the look and added a bit of style. It seemed simple enough that I had to try it.

Finding a few suitable starting pieces took a bit of hunting but I came across this beautiful rainbow plaid from American Eagle. It was an extra large, but their sizing runs small so it was too tight for me, including the arms.

The first thing was to do the ombre fade. I tried a few levels of bleach dilution and realized that you have to start with pure bleach. I used a spray bottle, outside on the cement driveway. To get a visible fade, I never went below 50% dilution, but just finished the fade out by lighter spraying. As soon as it was where I wanted, the whole thing was rinsed several times in clear water and then dried. (if I had realized exactly how I was going to alter the sleeves, that should have been done before the fading)

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It needed to be made quite a bit larger so the sleeves were cut off to the elbow length and then I fully cut out the side seams, including down what was left of the arms. The sleeves were enlarged by adding some of the cut-off forearm along the bottom. It was then finished along the top with the salvaged cuffs and a rolled hem completing the space between the cuff edges.

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The fade helped to soften the style, but I wanted to make it even more feminine and used a cream cotton eyelet lace to make the side inserts. (it also matched the lightest bottom of the fade) It was quite long for eyelet, but was still only about 2/3rds of the length of the sides. To make it fit, I layered a second panel over the first. This gave a bit of ruffle feel to the sides without adding much volume and it meant there was a second layer of fabric under the higher eyelets which made me more comfortable.

In this case, the buttons were left since they read as more decorative on the lightened fabric.

I love this top! It’s so soft and cheery and the swing of the expanded size combined with it’s bright colours and lace accents make it read as quite fun and feminine.

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