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Posts Tagged ‘altered fashion’

I started making long tops from oversized men’s shirts and while they were comfortable and did the job, they sometimes felt a bit too casual and the shorter length wasn’t totally within my modesty comfort range if I was out running around.1 I started to want something that would give me all the same benefits but would have more of “dressy” feel. (and yes, that word works both ways)

For my first attempt, I started with a Chaps men’s shirt in 4X. It had a lovely soft, strong fabric in a nice plaid and was very generously cut. (Higher end men’s shirts often have beautiful, comfortable fabrics that are wash and wear as well as typically coming with at least one pocket! They may not be all that common at the thrift stores, but are worth the hunt) It was quite large and long on me already so it was a fairly easy alter.

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The sleeves were too long so I cut them off right around the elbow. 2 I then removed the cuffs from the cut-off arms and the buttons. (I use a razor blade for most of my seam cutting but a seam ripper will do the job) I then lightly gathered the bottom of the new sleeve and reattached the cuff. About 4” or 5” of the sleeve, at the bottom of the arm, wasn’t inserted into the cuff but double folded over and seamed so make a hem for that section. This gives a bit of puff on the sleeve while keeping it roomy and the cuff is a low-effort finishing detail that helps sell the whole thing. If you have very skinny arms, and the cuffs are really large, you don’t have to add the hemmed space but can just pleat it all into the cuff. This process can be used to create whatever sleeve length you want.

I’ve seen examples where people have removed the sleeve and taken the length off the top, resetting it in the shoulder, which is an option, but for my plus sizes, I want to keep the room on the upper arm. (I also think that moving the cuff is less hassle than resetting a sleeve, but others may disagree)

The base shirt was large enough that I had a couple of good sized pieces left over after shortening the sleeves. To make things even more dress-like, I opened up the side seams from the bottom. The seam was cut high enough to match the length of the leftover arm fabric. Those pieces were cut into not-quite triangle wedges. I kept a bit of a flat line at the top and gathered it slightly. They were then sewn into the opened side seams. (I should mention that this particular shirt had a very soft, flowy fabric, so this addition just gave fullness without being too poofy) If you want to do this type of alteration but want as little emphasis on the hips, you can skip the gathering and just insert triangles, staring at whatever point lets you put the widest part where you want it.

Like many men’s shirt, this one had a downward curve that ran from the side seams to give extra length at the front and back. With the larger hemline from the side inserts and the already abundant length, I decided to simply cut it off. This gave me a straight line for the hem. I was going for a “dress” look so added a band of cotton eyelet lace. A fold-over hem ended the lace in line with the edges of the shirt so it can open at the front.

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All that was left was four simple darts to shape it at the waist and I replaced the buttons. The button change had a HUGE impact on the total look and I highly recommend it if you want to dress up anything you make with a shirt. In this case, I used antique mother-of-pearl from my supply stash, but any “pretty” button will do, just check to make sure they will fit through the buttonholes. If the perfect ones are a bit small and you don’t want to worry about them popping open, you can just run a seam down the front, so long as you keep the neck wide enough for it to be pulled on.

1I’m using the word “modesty” to describe my personal comfort point for having my body exposed. You do you, no judgment.

2I always want my upper arms covered. See footnote #1

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I decided it was time to start talking a bit about one of the areas of altered art that I’ve been playing with the past couple of years and it’s going to get personal so I wanted to start with a general explanation of how and why I got into it and why I’ve decided to blog about it.

I am, and have been for all of my adult life, fat. I’m also tall, nearly 6′, and broad-shouldered. As a result, clothing has pretty always been difficult for me. Finding comfortable, affordable, flattering things to wear is a constant nightmare. Add in that I also want them to be easy to care for, durable (both in style and wear) AND to match my own sense of taste, and it becomes almost impossible.

Working as a custom framer for years meant that I had to keep to a business casual/suitable for retail level and one that met with my bosses approval. Luckily, it’s (rightly) viewed as an “artistic” profession, so a bit of personal flair is acceptable. I mostly got by on long skirts, blouses and dresses.

Becoming my own boss has opened up some more options for me. I’ve gradually become more comfortable with expressing my personal taste, when it comes to what I wear. The rise of “disposable fashion” seems to have made the plus-sized clothing options in shops even worse, which I didn’t think was possible. That has driven me to modify/make even more of my clothes. As my daily wear has become personalized, I feel more confidant and relaxed about myself and I’ve had more and more people compliment my clothes and/or ask where I got it. Considering how many people have wanted to know how I’ve been making my stuff, I thought it made sense to start showing how it was done. I am not that accomplished as sewer, but most of what I’ve been doing doesn’t take much skill, you just have to be willing to jump in. I’m not going to do too much in the way of details, but if you have any questions, always feel free to ask and I’ll try to answer.

sun1

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